How to Manage Stress So That It Doesn’t Hurt Your Health

How to Manage Stress So That It Doesn't Hurt Your Health

We can’t eliminate stress, but we change the way our body responds to it. Another day goes by and as you fall into bed you’re left feeling, yet again, like you couldn’t fit everything in. As you ponder the mountain of obligations and concerns facing you tomorrow, that familiar undercurrent of stress courses through you, distracting you from the things that typically elicit happiness. And who could blame you? You’re juggling work, family and personal life while walking on a dental floss-sized tightrope, and it’s only a matter of time before it snaps under all the pressure. In fact, according to the American Psychological Associations 2017 stress in America survey, 45 percent of Americans admit to lying awake at night in the past month due to stress, and 75 percent indicated that they experienced at least one physical or emotional symptom of stress in the last month. Though the never-ending cycle of stress may leave you feeling disempowered and unsure of how to regain control of your life, there’s good news: it can be done. The first step is to identify the specific causes of your stress and acknowledge the symptoms they cause; then you can actively reset your day-to-day routine to alter how you handle the stressors you encounter and minimize their effect on your wellbeing.

WHAT’S CAUSING YOUR STRESS:

The important thing to consider is how we manage our stressors effectively, so it doesn’t get the best of us.

BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR THESE SYMPTOMS:     
  • Irritability
  • frustrated    
  • sluggish    
  • headaches 
  • stomachaches
  • depression
  • withdrawn
WAYS TO MINIMIZE THE IMPACT:

Treat your body well by getting at least seven hours of sleep a night, eat healthy foods frequently to stabilize your blood sugar and keep moving at least every 90 minutes during the day to facilitate optimal circulation.

IDENTIFY AND ANTICIPATE YOUR STRESSORS:

Knowing what things trigger your stress is really important. If you can do some coping ahead – planning for those moments- you can minimize stress.

SLOW DOWN:

Even just three to five minutes of slow, rhythmic breathing can start to train the nervous system to be more adaptive. Maybe even set aside 15 mindful minutes each morning. It could be journaling, listening to calming music or preparing your favorite breakfast foods.